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Industry Talk: Meet Mathias Humlen who is and manages FAKETHIAS

By Christian Gran Svenningsen

Mathias Humlen (Photo: Fredrik Austad)

“Embrace your imperfections,” is a piece of advice that has stuck, and helps him in his work

Mathias is an electronic music artist currently living in Oslo. His main focus these days is his project FAKETHIAS, which he categorizes as both «experimental» and related to club music.

In addition to managing and booking his alias, he also produces and performs as part of a couple of other bands. You may have heard of the groups “Softcore Untd” or “Sushi x Kobe” where he also plays a vital role.

Mathias is up for a Norwegian Grammy this year as well. Read more here

We had a chat with Mathias about his thoughts, tips and tricks in the industry. He has found his way around, and has gained a lot of experience and knowledge by just being present. Being an industry professional and an artist at the same time certainly requires structure and dedication. Let’s see what he told us:

“What has been on your to do list lately, and what takes most of your time?”

“Lately I’ve been working on creating a show I’ll be performing at some festivals this year, and finalizing a new release. I also book and manage the project myself, so I spend a lot of time sorting things out, generally.”

“What is the most important piece of advice you have ever received?”

“What first comes to mind is a really great artist once telling me that he believes it’s important to embrace your imperfections, instead of trying to cover them up. It might sound cheesy, but it’s great advice, especially when you’re mostly working on your own, obsessing over details.”

“Any helpful tips and tricks for a way around the industry?” 

“It helps to be present. I got to know people in the industry by going to shows and club nights on my own. Look for people who seem to have similar interests and see what they’re up to. Make friends, not just business partners.”

“Why Norway, why now? Where are we going?”

“I can only speak for electronic music. Doing electronic music in Norway, I feel like you’re somehow always on the outside looking in. There’s no big industry for it here compared to the rest of Europe, but there are quite a few people with interesting perspectives. So I think we’re still going somewhere else, at least.”

“Who in the Norwegian music industry deserves a high five?”

“My high five goes to Einar Idsøe Eidsvåg for making Revolver an open club space where we could do whatever we wanted, and book acts that probably only our friends cared about.”

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